“There Is No Spoon”: 3 Ways to Manage Brainstorming in the Matrix

I just don’t believe when they say they’re not “creative.” That’s bull. Some would even say they were born with not one creative bone in their body. Double bull. That’s a total cop-out, and I won’t stand for it. When it comes to brainstorming, know this: you were born with those creative juices, and the problem is you aren’t tapping into them at all. It’s like there’s no spigot there, so you can’t pour any of it out. It just sits there.

THis Is What You Do Then: You Think Like Neo!

You remember that movie called “The Matrix,” don’t you? The one about the dude in the black coat, shades and guns? Sure, it was a great action flick, and Keanu Reeves is super cool, but look underneath all the slickness and see that this is all about breaking molds, reinventing yourself and transcending what you think you know and essentially creating new worlds.

Brainstorming is easy when you try to “get outside the box” (only more so if you read here) and being a trendsetter. Besides that, really get into the grits of the movie. There were a lot of layers there, right? After all, I think it took me two tries to really grasp what the whole idea was.

This would make sense given the fact that Neo questioned everything. That’s how you optimize brainstorming. He questioned the world he lived in. He even questioned Morpheus. He even questioned the Oracle, if you remember. Skepticism fueled his imagination to envelope the “what if” of the world as he knew it, or the world he didn’t know, or the world that could be.

That’s the essence of brainstorming right there, especially here with these six creative ways to go about brainstorming effectively, that you absolutely have to see to believe.

Brainstorming: Is Seeing Believing Then?

That depends. After all, Neo thought he was looking at a spoon. What you see may not be what it seems. Right there you get the core of brainstorming. Let your imagination go and come up with ideas no one ever has.

Just stay away from the agents, though. They’re quite dangerous.

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